Volume 1 – Issue 2: Summer 2018


Teaching Behavioral Ethics (Using “Ethics Unwrapped” Videos and Educational Materials)
By Cara Biasucci and Robert Prentice


Key Words: ETHICS, BUSINESS ETHICS, BEHAVIORAL ETHICS, INCREMENTALISM, DECISION-MAKING

Abstract:
The business world is rife with scandals, making it especially important to teach ethical decision-making in
business schools. Unfortunately, the “shadow curriculum” that sometimes exists in business schools makes it
especially challenging to teach ethics effectively. Behavioral ethics research, however, is fascinating to study
and its application carries the potential to improve students’ ethical decisions and actions. This article
describes the basics of behavioral ethics, including the fundamental notion that good people do bad things
because of the influence of social and organizational pressures, cognitive heuristics and biases, and a variety
of situational factors. The article also introduces readers to a free resource that has proven effective in
improving business ethics pedagogy—the videos and supporting materials of the Ethics Unwrapped
Educational Program produced at the McCombs School of Business. The Ethics Unwrapped site is available
for all to use at EthicsUnwrapped.utexas.edu and is a resource for educators and students at more than a
thousand colleges and universities around the world.


Improve Student Success with Classroom Technology Use by Applying the Five Gears for Activating Learning
By Nanci K. Carr


Key Words: LEARNER-CENTERED INSTRUCTION, CLASSROOM TECHNOLOGY, MOTIVATING STUDENTS

Abstract:
In the age of over three million apps available in multiple app stores, and with more added every day, we often
reach to technology to assist us with everything from creating our grocery lists to paying our bills. Similarly,
we look to technology to improve the classroom experience for both teachers and students. However, we need
to be careful to use the right tool for the job, rather than finding a job for the tool. So, how do we do that? By
focusing our courses with the Five Gears for Activating Learning, we can integrate technology tools only if they
assist in supporting student success and achieving student learning outcomes.


Zealous Advocacy, Ethics and Future Business Practitioners: A Classroom Exercise
By Marc Lampe


Key Words: ZEALOUS ADVOCACY, ETHICS, BUSINESS ETHICS, LEGAL ETHICS, LAWYER ETHICS, BUSINESS EDUCATION, LEGAL EDUCATION, BUSINESS PEDAGOGY, BUSINESS LAW PEDAGOGY, BUSINESS LAW, LAW AND ETHICS, LAWYER CONDUCT, INTEGRITY, ADVERSARIAL SYSTEM

Abstract:
Under the Model Rules of Professional Conduct lawyers have a duty to be zealous advocates on behalf of their clients. This duty, especially when coupled with the pecuniary and ego benefits of winning, can lead to conduct by lawyers that may be unethical and, at times, illegal. The primary purpose of this exercise is to provide business law students with an awareness of this real-world issue that may arise in their personal and professional lives when they hire an attorney. Through an understanding that their own ethical rights and duties differ from those of their lawyer, this exercise prepares students to handle situations where their attorney may be advocating for, or acting in, an unethical manner. Solutions offered include: a client’s request to the attorney to cease and desist from such behaviors, and a client’s use of ADR. This exercise also may serve as a case study in ethics generally as it relates to business and the law.


Why and How to Add Negotiation to Your Introductory Law Course
By George Siedel


Key Words: NEGOTIATION, BUSINESS ETHICS, LEGAL ISSUES, ALTERNATE DISPUTE RESOLUTION, VALUE CREATION

Abstract:
An introductory legal environment or business law course is the ideal setting for an exercise that illustrates
the importance of business law and ethics in negotiations. This article discusses a short negotiation exercise
that can easily be incorporated into an introductory course. The exercise includes a unique twist (one of the
parties is a secret agent) that provides students with experience in applying legal and ethical principles. The
article explains how to set up the exercise and provides a script for a debriefing session. The article also
includes a link to the two negotiating party roles and PowerPoint slides that are available without charge.